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were in cincinnati, tens of thousands of people, you could feel the energy, 100 top tier surrogates at the event, i'm back stage with some of them, won't mention their names, talking about like he's reagan. the debate performances, the best of any republican nominee and presidential history. this guy is iconic. talking about him because they believed he was going to win in four or five days. some of them were already talking to our transition, to position themselves for a romney cabinet. >> they're the first to jump. >> i won't say who they are, they were on television, the body was -- it was unbelievable, five, six days lately, absolutely eviscerating him. >> that's the bigger problem. i want to go back to the first thing you said, there's this temptation to think that the winning side is the smartest. i actually think no, romney should have done better. >> we picked up 400,000 votes -- >> the whole thing should have been a better match. >> if we had picked up 400,000 votes in a handful of swing states -- >> don't go there. mitt romney would have been a genius. >> you're doing the
of the 21st century. this is where all the economic energy is, where all the dynamism is. what we're seeing in asia is what we saw a century ago. china, korea, vietnam, the tectonic plates are moving. the united states has to be involved. we've got to give these countries some reassurance. they have to understand they have an alternative to simply appeasing china. on the other hand, we don't want to set up a new cold war with china and for them to start acting recklessly. this is going to be the extraordinarily difficult balancing act, and the administration's going to have to figure out a way not to abandon the middle east but to put a ceiling on what we do in the middle east so we can do more at home but also so we can do more in this part are the world that's going to shape history a hell of a lot more than the middle east. >> aside from the economic issue, though, the nuclear proliferation has existential issues. what is your sense of where we will be with pakistan, afghanistan after the withdrawal? >> well, pakistan, i think, is the single toughest problem. we talked about iran for ten
gas exploration exploding across middle america. we are moving into an energy revolution over the next decade. it's not only going to change the face of american demographics and the u.s. economy, it's going to change our economic standing across the globe. it resets everything. resets everything. >> and all starts tremendous consequences, u.s. reliance and dependence on the middle east obviously changes when we become a larger oil producer than saudi arabia. >> and maybe we can stop fighting wars in the middle east. >> maybe. >> we can go to north dakota instead. i'm telling you, those canadians, i don't trust they will. i do not trust them! >> hey, we need to figure out, what's the line that separates, you know -- >> we need a parallel. >> we need a parallel. a canadian parallel. the canadians and i've been talking about this for years -- >> i'm going to take a poll. may i take the cane and beat joe on the head with it? >> seriously, how many divisions -- >> all those who agree, raise their hands. >> a lot of canadians watch "morning joe." we don't want to hurt you, we want your oil.
talk a little about was natural gas and fracking and how it might change our energy and we're look about bright lights. can you give us a bright light and perhaps that and why we should be optimistic. >> the bright lights are here, one, you'd rather have america's problem as serious as they are in those than any of the major companies we compete with, certainly europe and japan. i would argue china, as well. two, we are the cutting edge of change in a knowledged economy. our universities are the best universities. we're the country that people from all over want to come to. think about any of the great entrepreneurs of this era and there's a very good chance you're thinking of an american. three, as you say mark, we have a remarkable competitive position in natural gas. we've got huge amounts of it that can be produced at very low cost. we had a very important economic decision to make. should we keep it captive and use the lower costs to support american manufacturers to support other american businesses? or should we allow it to be exported, improving our competitive position, ge
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